ADVANCED FIRST SEMESTER ASSIGNS
WATCH THE LIGHT PAINTING VIDEO
DAVE BLACK LIGHT PAINTING ARTICLE
LIGHT PAINTING EXAMPLES

Painting with Light
Assignment: TWO TYPES OF LIGHT PAINTING.
YOU WILL BE MAKING IMAGES USING 2 TYPES OF LIGHT PAINTING
.

What you’ll need. A tripod, flashlight(s), camera set on manual mode, lens on manual mode & some really cool looking objects that you want to photograph.

Shoot a minimum of 25 images
Turn in 2 images (one of each style of light painting) and a screengrab of your 25 images on a proofsheet. 
Title your images:
p3advlastname_lightpaint1

P3advlastname_lightpaint2
P3advlastname_lightpaint3


What to do: #1 “Dave Black” style light painting.

1. Go into a room that you can make almost completely dark (or go outside at night. –but, if you go outside, it must be in an area that is not illuminated by any other light source.  It has to be really dark!)
2. Put the camera on a tripod.
3. Put your camera on Manual exposure.
4. For exposure, try: f/8 or f/11, shutter on 15 or 20 or 30 seconds, ISO 100 or 200… (These exposure settings are an estimate. Your exposure will vary.  You want to give yourself enough time to paint your object, but not too much time so that available light “contaminates” your photo.
5. Put the camera on self-timer so you can be ready to paint with the flashlight when the shutter opens.
6. Put the lens on Manual focus! Focus the lens on the subject BEFORE you turn off the lights.
7. Turn off the lights, open the shutter and use your flashlight to “paint” an object with light. Experiment with different amounts of light on different areas of your subject.  Look at the slideshow examples for examples of “Dave Black” style light painting.
  

What to do: #2 “Light Trails” style light painting
1. As before, put your camera on a tripod and set your exposure and focus to manual settings.

2. Use a flash light, iPod or other light source, point it toward the camera and use the light traces to create patterns of light, or to outline objects.
TIPS: Experiment with different exposures and how fast you move the light..